Going Analog

So, I like technology in the classroom. Every time the…uh…debates about it come up, I’m definitively on the “for” side for numerous reasons. That doesn’t mean that I don’t see the flaws with using some tech and/or the complications that can arise from having tech in the classroom. I just think the good outweighs the bad.

That being said, I also like to have my students do a lot of things on paper (if possible and accessible) for a variety of reasons. Sometimes it’s just faster. Sometimes I might want them to sketch something in a way that might be more complicated to do on a device. Sometimes I might want them to easily swap an activity with one another. Etc.

Another important reason that comes to mind is that sometimes it can be valuable to have them work out and/or practice something that they’re going to be doing digitally in an analog format first. Because sometimes the very digital-ness of an assignment can become a bit of a distraction to the thinking process. This is something that I’ve been thinking about since last year’s Digital Media and Composition Institute (DMAC). If you’re not familiar with DMAC, it is essentially what the title describes. During the institute, several educators, from across the country, come to OSU to discuss digital media, composition, pedagogy, and issues of access. Additionally, during the institute, participants create their own compositions in a variety of formats. I attended the institute in 2015, and I’ve been lucky enough to be employed by the institute both last year and this year, which has been a fantastic experience.

During last year’s DMAC, one of the things participants composed, as well as discussed using in the classroom, was an infographic. Things we did in that process included talking about infographics, looking at examples, and examining sites that can be used to make them (shout out to Canva and Piktochart). But perhaps one of the key components of the process (at least to me) was having folks make infographics on paper first. Participant Tiffany Mitchell talks about the value of that step here.

As I was retooling my First Year Writing syllabus this semester, I knew that I wanted to make some changes to how my students would first start to think about their research. I wanted them to think more about how to assess the quality of a source (rather than how to find a specific type of source), and I wanted them to think more about the secondary sources in relation to one another. This developed into a 3-step resource chunk in the middle of the semester, which entails: an evaluation of sources they’ve found in their preliminary research, a brief presentation on one of the sources, and a listicle about their research.

I got the idea for that last piece here. I really liked the idea of the listicle because it would get at the synthesis I wanted, and it would also challenge to think about rhetoric a bit differently than what we’ve done in the class thus far. Plus, I’ve been encouraging them to develop their voices this semester, and I try to provide some creative options that allow them to do that more easily. I also knew that it was probably a format that most of them had not written in (explicitly) even though they’ve probably encountered them on the internet (in fact, as we talked about them in class, it became clear to me that some of them had never encountered the word “listicle” even if they had read listicles before).

Earlier this week, I posted a handful of listicles on our class home page and gave them time in class to explore them (some were just text, some were text and pictures, and some were text plus various other forms of media). We then discussed how the listicles function, how the text interacts with the images/gifs/etc, and ways in which they could create listicles. I’ve done a similar process in the past when I’ve had students making podcasts and transmedia extensions. I think it’s really valuable for them to be able to see and analyze several examples of unfamiliar forms before they start creating their own.

Building off of that, today I had the students work in small groups to make analog listicles. I brought in a bunch of materials (poster boards, construction paper, magazines, glue sticks, scissors, and glue sticks) to facilitate the process. The readings that they had for class today were about the intersection of food and technology, so I told them that their listicles needed to, in some way, reflect the impact that technology has had on food. At the end of class, they had to display their listicles in the classroom, and I talked a bit about why I had them do this so that they could make the connection to their upcoming assignment.

It was fun to watch them work on this and listen to how they figured out what to write. At first, some of the students were really baffled by how to start, and I did give some nudges here and there. But for the most part, they figured it out on their own. And they got pretty creative with the available resources. I really liked doing this because it gives them practice, I could see how they were thinking in real time, I could see where I need to do some further explanation next week ahead of the due date for their actual listicle assignment (for example, I think a little bit more clarity about the difference between a listicle and an outline might be useful), and it was honestly just a nice way to break up the standard flow of class. I suppose some folks might think this assignment is a bit too K-12 for college students, but uh, (1) I was a secondary teacher before I started grad school, and I’d say that quite a lot of things that work well with 12 year olds also work well with 20 year olds, and (2) I mean, you’re never too old to color.

So.

Fridays are when they do their minute papers for the week, and here are some of the responses I got at the end of today’s class:

  • Several variations of “I now know/understand what a listicle is”
  • “The most important thing this week was the examples of the listicles. I have never heard of this before, but now I feel more prepared to create one on my own”
  • “The most important thing I learned this week is that listicles are very fun to read and make. Great way to express oneself”

And some questions that I plan to follow up on next week:

  • “Do we cite pictures in the listicle?”
  • “Can we look at more listicle examples next week?”
  • “Are we allowed to hand write our listicle?” (honestly, did not see this one coming, but I’m intrigued)

And finally, some pictures:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Advertisements

2 comments

  1. Oh, this is very good. I have done a listicle writing assignment before but this is a good reminder of how I can play around with and teach these concepts without having a full graded assignment attached.

    “I suppose some folks might think this assignment is a bit too K-12 for college students” — Pfft. I always say that K-12 teachers have the best ideas. I steal most of my best stuff from them!

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s