Month: December 2018

Dispatches from the Dissertation (Part 10), the Job Market, and Pedagogical Fun

So I wrote my dissertation Introduction. I purposefully waited until I had the chapters drafted before starting the Intro. I know some people take the opposite approach, and I tend to start with the Intro on shorter pieces of writing. But for my dissertation (Which Is Now Hovering Around The 250 Page Mark OMG What On Earth), I really needed to know what I was saying before I could try to figure out how to introduce it. Out of all of the drafts I’ve written thus far, I think I might feel most confident in the Intro. And that’s not because I’m not also confident in the chapters, but it’s because I think that purely by way of continuous writing practice/feedback/revision in this project, I can see pay offs. The intro draft benefits from all I’ve learned along the way. Plus, the dissertation workshop class I participated in this semester really helped me to get a better sense of how my writing comes across to readers and how I can continue to improve as I make revisions leading up to the defense. If your department and/or university offers a class like this, I would definitely recommend taking it. Admittedly, sending out pieces of your writing to a bunch of people can be stressful, but I think the good outweighs the bad. At least, it did for me. Plus, I got to talk about a topic that I love quite a bit, which was an added bonus.

Lamb Chop, Hush Puppy, and Charlie Horse meme with the Song that Never Ends

I’m working on my Conclusion now, and I find something deeply ironic about crafting an ending to a project about remakes, reboots, etc…

In other news, I’ve also spent most of this semester deeply enmeshed in the academic job market. I’m probably not going to post too many specific details at this juncture, but I can say that I’ve applied to a fair amount of jobs, most of which have their own particular requirements for application. What this means, if you intend to go on the market, is that you’ll need a significant amount of time in order to complete applications. For me, this has meant being even for more intentional about keeping my schedule. It has also meant that I have had to work more often on the weekends. I say all of this to say that dissertating, applying for jobs, and teaching simultaneously is a heavy load that will require increased time management, planning, etc. For me, I think it’s worth it. I’m pretty clear about what I want to do (whether it pans out in reality is TBD). For some though, the whole process might not be worthwhile (for a variety of reasons). And I think that’s totally valid and reasonable! I’ve been happy to see more and more programs and professors discussing futures outside the professoriate this year because I think it’s important and necessary. But there’s still a long way to go on that front.

I got to teach Intro to Pop Culture this semester, which is a class that I’ve wanted to teach for most of my PhD career. The relatively open parameters of the class allowed me to incorporate an assortment of my research interests into the class (the syllabus is accessible on the syllabus tab). By the end, most of my students had noted that while they knew about pop culture when the semester started, they’d never thought about it (and its various tentacles) in as much depth as we did in the class. This is the kind of thing that I love about the material I research. I love taking something that is often interpreted as commonplace or irrelevant or unimportant and really digging into what lies beneath the surface. For the final project of the class, we developed a collaborative alphabet of what the students believed to be the most important/influential figures/people/ideas in pop culture. You can check that out here.

In my upcoming final semester at OSU, I’m scheduled to teach Digital Media Composing for the second time. If you’ve been following along here for a while, you might recall that Digital Media Composing was the class I was teaching when I started this site. It remains one of my favorites out of all of the classes I’ve ever taught, and I’m excited to take another swing at it. In terms of digital media itself, so much of it has changed since Fall 2016, and I can’t wait to jump into it with a new group of students.

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