Netflix

What’s a Few Weeks Between Blog Posts?

Heyyyyyy so you know how you write things on your agenda, but you keep forgetting to actually do them (like say, “update your blog”)? That’s been me for the past few weeks. This was partially spurred on by going out of town for a wedding and also by the fact that I’m neck deep in reading for my exams, which are coming up in a few weeks (*falls out*). Nevertheless, I have returned from the depths of notetaking¬†despair for an update.

When I last posted, students were exploring the many ways in which Netflix, and streaming in general, have influenced television. This included a deep dive into binge watching, which my students were mostly in favor of (and I found this particularly interesting because while they supported that particular innovation, they were almost entirely not in favor in live tweeting *kanyeshrug*).

Our focus has shifted since then to fandom and participatory culture. In particular, we took up the topic of representation in media and how fan creations often attempt to remedy perceived lacks in representation or poor representations. This conversation produced some of the most spirited interest this semester, which naturally appealed to me given my own scholarly interests in media representations. If we had more class time, I’d definitely want to delve in further (something to think about if I end up teaching this class again).

However, much of our time over the past two weeks has necessarily been devoted to podcasts. This is because my students’ next big project is a short podcast creation of their own. In keeping with our recent fandom theme, the podcasts have to be about television shows. This week has been entirely workshop time, which I think is especially important to have for assignments like this in case students have questions. It’s been interesting to watch (most of) them work solidly for almost 80 full minutes at a time. I’ve had students do in class writing assignments in the past and found it difficult to get them to focus for extended periods of time, but for this project, that hasn’t really been an issue. Speaking from personal experience, I think there’s something about working with audio and video projects that brings out the inner perfectionist (at least for me) and can make a person want to put in more work than what might happen with a writing assignment.

I had been worried that there’d be a significant technological learning curve (even though we did have one in class tutorial day with Audacity), but so far that hasn’t seemed to be the case. In fact, I’d say there were far more questions about using Twitter and Storify earlier in the semester than there have been about this project. They turn in their podcasts next week, and I’m very excited to hear what they’ve produced.

Netflix-y

In class this week, we pivoted from a focus on social media and television to a focus on Netflix and how it has (or hasn’t) changed the television landscape. We’ll be working with Netflix for a few weeks and exploring a variety of areas, such as how Netflix has affected television production, Netflix’s relationship to viewer desires and expectations, and binge watching. This week was primarily just about laying the groundwork and beginning to think about the ways in which Netflix came into such a position of prominence. Amongst the many questions we’re considering is “what makes a show a Netflix show?” To that end, we started our foray by looking at the first episode of Full House and the first episode of Fuller House. To some extent, they are essentially the same show (after all, that’s why people bought into the reboot), but there are ways in which the reboot definitely became Netflix-y that I wanted us to be able to identify.¬†And we’ll be continuing to make such comparisons between broadcast/cable shows and Netflix shows for the next few weeks as we consider how Netflix has affected television production.

Today, we talked a lot about whether Netflix was turning us into puppets and about whether we were comfortable with the amount of data that Netflix is gleaning from us. We talked about data mining previously when we discussed live tweeting, and the students were apt to pick up the connection here. The readings for today’s class presented different perspectives on the issue, and I could tell that many of the students had mixed feelings about how Netflix was using their information.

In order to really dig into the readings, I had them each choose what they believed to be the most significant/important/interesting quote from each reading. Then I had them share their quotes or reasonings in groups. Next, each group had to agree one significant quote from each reading that they would share with the class. And then, as we went through each reading, each group presented their quotes, we discussed them, and I went over additional points from the readings that I wanted to address. If it hasn’t already become obvious, I really enjoy making them talk to each other. It serves a variety of purposes, including but not limited to me not having to talk the entire time and it gives me the opportunity to listen in on what they’re thinking, bearing in mind that when I ask people to speak as large group, some people are uncomfortable doing so. But hearing how they’re thinking through things in their smaller groups helps me to figure out what I need to emphasize in my contributions.

They also had to watch episodes of Chef’s Table and Bojack Horseman for today (so we could deepen our discussion of what makes a show Netflix-y) to which their respective reactions were basically “great” and “weird.” Yeah, basically.